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Make the Most of Every Consultation

Even with individuals who appear to have limited skin involvement, there can be a disconnect between a patient’s perception of disease severity and clinical assessments.1,2 The disconnect may arise from the use of standardised tools by physicians and the more subjective self-assessments done by patients.

PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER is a tool that aims to help patients prepare for consultations so that you can make the most of the time you have with them. Share it with your patients to help ensure more focused and comprehensive conversations in future consultations.

For patients with clinically moderate disease, the full impact of their psoriasis may be difficult to uncover without a deep understanding of how psoriasis is affecting their normal routine. An optimal consultation uncovers both the visible and invisible impacts of psoriasis. The PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER Guide can help patients with clinically moderate disease better express their unmet needs.

Make the most of every consultation

Even with individuals who appear to have limited skin involvement, there can be a disconnect between a patient’s perception of disease severity and clinical assessments.1,2 The disconnect may arise from the use of standardised tools by physicians and the more subjective self-assessments done by patients.

PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER is a tool that aims to help patients prepare for consultations so that you can make the most of the time you have with them. Share it with your patients to help ensure more focused and comprehensive conversations in future consultations.

For patients with clinically moderate disease, the full impact of their psoriasis may be difficult to uncover without a deep understanding of how psoriasis is affecting their normal routine. An optimal consultation uncovers both the visible and invisible impacts of psoriasis. The PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER Guide can help patients with clinically moderate disease better express their unmet needs.

What do you do to help your psoriasis patients make the most of each consultation?

PATIENT EVIDENCE

Patients may not perceive their psoriasis the same way that you do1,3

There is a high level of patient-reported severity, even when BSA is considered clinically moderate.

As part of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey, a survey of 3426 patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, patients were asked to use a rating scale of 1 (very mild) to 10 (very severe) to rate their psoriasis. In patients who may be considered to have clinically moderate disease (4 to 10 palm lesions), 39% considered their psoriasis severe.

Patients may not perceive_Mobile Patients may not perceive

Finding out more about how patients assess their psoriasis may help

Dr Gayathri Perera, a dermatologist at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, shares her views on what types of personal information she retrieves from patients with psoriasis.

Patient evidence can help resolve the disconnect4

Patient evidence includes the diverse information patients provide, including patient narratives, data of health-related quality of life, and survey data. The breadth of information on patient experiences is increasingly important to delivering high-quality care. PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER can help you gather patient evidence by informing patients on how to best provide it to you.

Watch Dr Gayathri Perera discuss how she gathers patient evidence.

Watch Video

Patient Evidence-Resolve disconnect-Mobile Patient Evidence-Resolve disconnect

Having the difficult conversations may make all the difference

Dr Gayathri Perera shares her take on the value in developing a relationship with her patients with psoriasis that makes them comfortable to talk about the more personal side of their psoriasis.

What role does patient evidence play in the care of your psoriasis patients?

HEALTH LITERACY

Improving health literacy can positively impact patients, including those with clinically moderate disease5

Use the entire clinical patient experience to improve psoriasis patients’ ability to seek, understand, and utilise health information. PSORIASIS IMPACTS MATTER can help patients to understand the value of their experiences and teach them to provide the relevant information so that it is meaningful to your consultations.

What methods do you and your practice use to improve the health literacy of your psoriasis patients?

TREATMENT EXPECTATIONS

Treatment goals should be improvement in skin clearance and reduction of symptoms important to patients6

The key considerations in treatment decisions and goals are a balance of clinical, practical, and emotional factors.4

Finding balance requires exploring the nuances of what patients share about their disease and the visible and invisible impacts psoriasis has on their everyday lives.6

While keeping signs and symptoms at bay, improving normal functional activities, and improving self-esteem are important goals for dermatologists and patients alike, patients also indicate that goals like having confidence in their therapy, having no fear the disease will become worse, and needing less time for daily treatment are also important.7,8

What methods do you use with psoriasis patients to set mutual goals for treatment?

References: 1. Lebwohl MG, Bachelez H, Barker J, et al. Patient perspectives in the management of psoriasis: results from the population-based Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Survey. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;70(5):871-881.e1-30. 2. Kavanaugh A, Helliwell P, Ritchlin CT. Psoriatic arthritis and burden of disease: patient perspectives from the population-based Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey. Rheumatol Ther. 2016;3:91-102. 3. van de Kerkhof PC, Reich K, Kavanaugh A, et al. Physician perspectives in the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: results from the population-based Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis survey. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015;29(10):2002-2010. 4. Staniszewska S, Boardman F, Gunn L, et al. The Warwick Patient Experiences Framework: patient-based evidence in clinical guidelines. Int J Qual Health Care. 2014;26(2):151-157. 5. Larsen MH, Strumse YAS, Borge CR, Osborne R, Andersen MH, Wahl AK. Health literacy: a new piece of the puzzle in psoriasis care? A cross-sectional study. Br J Dermatol. 2019;180(6):1506-1516. 6. Strober BE, van der Walt JM, Armstrong AW, et al. Clinical goals and barriers to effective psoriasis care. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2019;9(1):5-18. 7. Mrowietz U, Kragballe K, Reich K, et al. Definition of treatment goals for moderate to severe psoriasis: a European consensus. Arch Dermatol Res. 2011;303(1):1-10. 8. Blome C, Gosau R, Radtke MA, et al. Patient-relevant treatment goals in psoriasis. Arch Dermatol Res. 2016;308(2):69-78. 9. Ellulu MS, Patimah I, Khaza’ai H, Rahmat A, Abed Y. Obesity and inflammation: the linking mechanism and the complications. Arch Med Sci. 2017;13(4):851-863. 10. Aldredge LM, Higham RC. Manifestations and management of difficult-to-treat psoriasis. J Dermatol Nurses Assoc. 2018;10(4):189-197. 11. Yélamos O, Ros S, Puig L. Improving patient outcomes in psoriasis: strategies to ensure treatment adherence. Psoriasis (Auckl). 2015:5;109-115. 12. Alcusky M, Lee S, Lau G, et al. Dermatologist and patient preferences in choosing treatments for moderate to severe psoriasis. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2017;7(4):463-483.

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